|| Home || Books || About ||



Links

News & Current Affairs

Pickering Post
Russia Today | World News
Blacklisted News
The Guardian UK
Huffington Post
Newmatilda
Daily Mail | Science
Inside Story
Voice of Russia | World News
Reuters | Breaking News
Psylords
New Scientist



Human Interest

The Crowhouse | Not AFL
Singularity Hub
Divine Cosmos
Wake Up World
Next Nature
Truth Now
Business Insider | SAI
Pure Energy Systems
True Tube | No Censorship

Sheeple




20-October 2013

Never suffer a warm beer again!

Gadget chills drinks cans and bottles in just 30 seconds by spinning them

Two beer lovers have invented a gadget to ensure a warm beer never has to be endured again.

Trevor Abbott and Ty Parker came up with the idea for the Spin Chill while they were waiting for two warm beers to cool in ice.

The gadget works by spinning the beer can in ice to increase the rate of heat transfer significantly through convection - the transfer of heat from one place to another by the movement of fluids.

Mr Parker, from St Augustine, Florida, said: 'We've run into the problem multiple times during our college career where we would be stuck with warm beers with only one way to cool them down, throw them in ice water and wait.

'So, we decided to use our knowledge of heat transfer and love of cold beers to create the first Spin Chill prototype.'

The Spin Chill works by spinning the beer in a cool box full of ice so that the cold from the exterior of the can cools the liquid inside 20 times faster than if the can was simply placed in the ice box.

Its creators said the temperature of the drink can reach freezing in just two to three minutes using the device. The pair both studied mechanical engineering at the University of Florida and were attending a hackathon - an event where participants can come together to create new ideas - when the first Spin Chill was created.

The Chill Bit is a drill attachment that fits on to the top of a can or bottle. The 'Beerouette', based on a drill , is a standalone, motorised device that spins the drink while it is submerged in ice

Mr Parker said: 'The initial prototype was hacked together at the competition the next day from a power drill, a baby bottle, and a roll or two of duct tape.

'Since then we have been prototyping, developing and refining the designs as well as creating the next product and have been enjoying travelling around, sharing our story and drinking cold beers with like minded people.'

The gadget works by spinning the beer can in ice to increase the rate of heat transfer significantly through convection - the transfer of heat from one place to another by the movement of fluids.

The pair explain on their website: 'It all has to do with the air pocket. A 'carbonated beverage' is one in which carbon dioxide is dissolved in the liquid under pressure.

'When the can is opened, the liquid inside starts to equalise with the pressure in the atmosphere, and the CO2 comes out of solution to do so.

'All carbonated beverages fizz upon opening, but whether they fizz over depends on how fast the CO2 comes out of the solution.'

Trevor Abbott (right) and Ty Parker (left) came up with the idea for the Spin Chill while they were waiting for two warm beers to cool in ice.

Mr Parker said the initial prototype was hacked together from a power drill, a baby bottle, and a roll or two of duct tape

They said that for the carbon dioxide to escape suddenly, it needs gaseous pockets or an irregularity along the wall so when a drink is shaken, the air pocket is broken up into millions of small pockets, dispersed throughout the liquid.

'When the container is opened, CO2 in the solution has sites all over the place, and it comes out of the solution so quickly, that the liquid has no time to get out of the way, and it rises up and out, that is, it fizzes over,' they said. However, the pair explained that when a beverage is rotated, the air pocket stays intact and knocks all the small bubbles off the side of the container, making one larger air pocket.

'There are no nucleation sites dispersed throughout and the usual slow decarbonation takes place at the infrequent irregularities and at the surface,' they added.

Mobile Front Page





HTML Comment Box is loading comments...